Precis on Athletic Prosthetics

This Precis will outline articles that are key for Occupational Therapist and other practitioners to understand prosthetic for injured athletes. Providing broad information on the topic to essential information on different types and what is best for the specific sport being played.

McCarvill, S. (2005). Essay: Prosthetics for athletes. Lancet366, S10–S11.

In McCarvill’s article “Essay: Prosthetics for athletes”(2005), she explains that current challenges and innovations in the prosthetics field. McCarville supports her overview by explaining the challenges that engineers and designers face when designing prosthetics for athletes. She explains that each sports have different implications such as golf requiring a complex, synchronized full-body motion. Her purpose is to identify what each sports demands are and how to determine what prosthetic is the best fit for the sport. This is stated in a professional tone so the message is relayed to scholars in fields of designers, engineers, and therapists.

Highsmith, M. J., Kahle, J. T., Miro, R. M., Cress, M. E., Lura, D. J., Quillen, W. S., … Mengelkoch, L. J. (2016). Functional performance differences between the Genium and C-Leg prosthetic knees and intact knees. Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development53(6), 753–766. 

In Highsmith’s (etal.) article “Functional performance differences between the Genium and C-Leg prosthetic knees and intact knees.”(2016) they compare functional performance between two different types of prosthetic knees while also comparing them to an intact knee; stating that with TFA did not equal or surpass functional domain compared to intact knees. Highsmith supports his claim by designing a randomized crossover experiment with a control of five non-amputees. The purpose of this study was to suggest that there is room for improvement in the TFA’s functional performance. This study was written in a professional tone to address his claim to therapists and practitioners trying to decide what is the best prosthetic to acquire.

Bragaru, M., Dekker, R., Geertzen, J. H. B., & Dijkstra, P. U. (2011). Amputees and Sports. Sports Medicine41(9), 721–740. 

In Bragaru’s(etal.) article “Amputees and Sports”(2011) they explain why functional prosthetics for athletes is something that should be used during rehabilitation programs and should be continued after discharge. They support this claim by providing a systematic review of all the literature on biomechanics, cardiopulmonary function, and others. The purpose of this study is to convince practitioners and therapist that participation in sports and physical activity is beneficial for the patient’s overall health. This article was written in a professional tone to address their claim to therapists and practitioners providing rehabilitation services.

Healy, A., Farmer, S., Pandyan, A., & Chockalingam, N. (2018). A systematic review of randomised controlled trials assessing effectiveness of prosthetic and orthotic interventions. PLoS ONE13(3), 1–42. 

In Healy’s(etal.) article “A systematic review of randomised controlled trials assessing effectiveness of prosthetic and orthotic interventions” (2018) they assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of prosthetics. Mentioning 100 million people (1.5%) are in need prosthetics. Healy supported their claim by conducting a review of randomized controlled trials and assessed them for their effectiveness. The purpose of this is to show practitioners and therapists what is the most effective and cost-effective prosthetics for their clients. This article was written in a professional tone to address their claim to therapists and practitioners giving out prostetics.

Windrich, M., Grimmer, M., Christ, O., Rinderknecht, S., & Beckerle, P. (2016). Active lower limb prosthetics: a systematic review of design issues and solutions. BioMedical Engineering OnLine15, 5–19. 

In Windrich’s(etal.) article “Active lower limb prosthetics: a systematic review of design issues and solutions.” (2016) they assess the functionality of multiple active lower limb prosthetic. Stating that a high-level of control is key for the development of prosthesis. Windrich supports their claim by reviewing the literature and assessing for two key aspects, actuation and control design. The purpose of this is to show practitioners and therapists what features the best lower limb prospects need. This article was written in a professional tone to therapists and practitioners that are trying to find information on lower body proestetics.

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